Borrowed thoughts, like borrowed money, only show the poverty of the borrower.
Anonymous

Complete Letters of Mark Twain Ebook

Complete Letters of Mark Twain
Category:

Complete Letters of Mark Twain

$3.00 $1.99
Add to Cart

PDF
Buy Now and get a second e-book for free!!!
Click here to see the long list of these ebooks
(priced for $3.00 or less).


Add to Wish List

+$5

Title: Complete Letters of Mark Twain
Author:
Description:
MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1853-1910

ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE

FOREWORD

Nowhere is the human being more truly revealed than in his letters.
Notin literary letters--prepared with care, and the thought of possible publication--but in those letters wrought out of the press of circumstances, and with no idea of print in mind. A collection of such documents, written by one whose life has become of interest to mankind at large, has a value quite aside from literature, in that it reflects in some degree at least the soul of the writer.

The letters of Mark Twain are peculiarly of the revealing sort. He was a man of few restraints and of no affectations. In his correspondence, as in his talk, he spoke what was in his mind, untrammeled by literary conventions.

Necessarily such a collection does not constitute a detailed life story, but is supplementary to it. An extended biography of Mark Twain has already been published. His letters are here gathered for those who wish to pursue the subject somewhat more exhaustively from the strictly personal side. Selections from this correspondence were used in the biography mentioned. Most of these are here reprinted in the belief that an owner of the "Letters" will wish the collection to be reasonably complete.

[Etext Editor's Note: A. B. Paine considers this compendium a supplement to his "Mark Twain, A Biography", I have arranged the volumes of the
"Letters" to correspond as closely as possible with the dates of the Project Gutenberg six volumes of the "Biography". D.W.]

MARK TWAIN--A BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY

SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS, for nearly half a century known and celebrated as "Mark Twain," was born in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835.
He was one of the foremost American philosophers of his day; he was the world's most famous humorist of any day. During the later years of his life he ranked not only as America's chief man of letters, but likewise as her best known and best loved citizen.

The beginnings of that life were sufficiently unpromising. The family was a good one, of old Virginia and Kentucky stock, but its circumstances were reduced, its environment meager and disheartening. The father, John Marshall Clemens--a lawyer by profession, a merchant by vocation--had brought his household to Florida from Jamestown, Tennessee, somewhat after the manner of judge Hawkins as pictured in The Gilded Age. Florida was a small town then, a mere village of twenty-one houses located on Salt River, but judge Clemens, as he was usually called, optimistic and speculative in his temperament, believed in its future. Salt River would be made navigable; Florida would become a metropolis. He established a small business there, and located his family in the humble frame cottage where, five months later, was born a baby boy to whom they gave the name of Samuel--a family name--and added Langhorne, after an old Virginia friend of his father.

The child was puny, and did not make a very sturdy fight for life.
Still he weathered along, season after season, and survived two stronger children, Margaret and Benjamin. By 1839 Judge Clemens had lost faith in Florida. He removed his family to Hannibal, and in this Mississippi River town the little lad whom the world was to know as Mark Twain spent his early life. In Tom Sawyer we have a picture of the Hannibal of those days and the atmosphere of his boyhood there.

His schooling was brief and of a desultory kind. It ended one day in
1847, when his father died and it became necessary that each one should help somewhat in the domestic crisis. His brother Orion, ten years his senior, was already a printer by trade. Pamela, his sister; also considerably older, had acquired music, and now took a few pupils.
The little boy Sam, at twelve, was apprenticed to a printer named Ament.
His wages consisted of his board and clothes--"more board than clothes," as he once remarked to the writer.

He remained with Ament until his brother Orion bought out a small paper in Hannibal in 1850. The paper, in time, was moved into a part of the Clemens home, and the two brothers ran it, the younger setting most of the type. A still younger brother, Henry, entered the office as an apprentice. The Hannibal journal was no great paper from the beginning, and it did not improve with time. Still, it managed to survive--country papers nearly always manage to survive--year after year, bringing in some sort of return. It was on this paper that young Sam Clemens began his writings--burlesque, as a rule, of local characters and conditions-- usually published in his brother's absence; generally resulting in trouble on his return. Yet they made the paper sell, and if Orion had but realized his brother's talent he might have turned it into capital even then.

In 1853 (he was not yet eighteen) Sam Clemens grew tired of his limitations and pined for the wider horizon of the world. He gave out to his family that he was going to St. Louis, but he kept on to New York, where a World's Fair was then going on. In New York he found employment at his trade, and during the hot months of 1853 worked in a printing- office in Cliff Street. By and by he went to Philadelphia, where he worked a brief time; made a trip to Washington, and presently set out for the West again, after an absence of more than a year.

Onion, meanwhile, had established himself at Muscatine, Iowa, but soon after removed to Keokuk, where the brothers were once more together, till following their trade. Young Sam Clemens remained in Keokuk until the winter of 1856-57, when he caught a touch of the South-American fever then prevalent; and decided to go to Brazil. He left Keokuk for Cincinnati, worked that winter in a printing-office there, and in April took the little steamer, Paul Jones, for New Orleans, where he expected to find a South-American vessel. In Life on the Mississippi we have his story of how he met Horace Bixby and decided to become a pilot instead of a South American adventurer--jauntily setting himself the stupendous task of learning the twelve hundred miles of the Mississippi River between St.
Louis and New Orleans--of knowing it as exactly and as unfailingly, even in the dark, as one knows the way to his own features. It seems incredible to those who knew Mark Twain in his later years--dreamy, unpractical, and indifferent to details--that he could have acquired so vast a store of minute facts as were required by that task. Yet within eighteen months he had become not only a pilot, but one of the best and most careful pilots on the river, intrusted with some of the largest and most valuable steamers. He continued in that profession for two and a half years longer, and during that time met with no disaster that cost his owners a single dollar for damage.

Then the war broke out. South Carolina seceded in December, 1860 and other States followed. Clemens was in New Orleans in January, 1861, when Louisiana seceded, and his boat was put into the Confederate service and sent up the Red River. His occupation gone, he took steamer for the North--the last one before the blockade closed. A blank cartridge was fired at them from Jefferson Barracks when they reached St. Louis, but they did not understand the signal, and kept on. Presently a shell carried away part of the pilot-house and considerably disturbed its inmates. They realized, then, that war had really begun.

In those days Clemens's sympathies were with the South. He hurried up to Hannibal and enlisted with a company of young fellows who were recruiting with the avowed purpose of "throwing off the yoke of the invader." They were ready for the field, presently, and set out in good order, a sort of nondescript cavalry detachment, mounted on animals more picturesque than beautiful. Still, it was a resolute band, and might have done very well, only it rained a good deal, which made soldiering disagreeable and hard.
Lieutenant Clemens resigned at the end of two weeks, and decided to go to Nevada with Orion, who was a Union abolitionist and had received an appointment from Lincoln as Secretary of the new Territory.

In 'Roughing It' Mark Twain gives us the story of the overland journey made by the two brothers, and a picture of experiences at the other end-true in aspect, even if here and there elaborated in detail. He was

Orion's private secretary, but there was no private-secretary work to do, and no salary attached to the position. The incumbent presently went to mining, adding that to his other trades.

Complete Letters of Mark Twain

$3.00 $1.99
Add to Cart

PDF
Buy Now and get a second e-book for free!!!
Click here to see the long list of these ebooks
(priced for $3.00 or less).


Add to Wish List
Editor: Alex Smit
Price: $3.00
Rating:
Related Books:
The Complete Guide to Affiliate Marketing
Author: Gabe Alex
Category: Affiliates
Price: $37.00
The Mark Twain Collection
Author: Mark Twain
Category: Classic
Price: $9.95
The Complete Music Notation Encyclopedia
Category: Music
Price: $19.95
50 Complete Building Construction Blueprint Plan
Category: Home, Real Estate
Price: $37.00
97 Marketing Secrets To Make More Money
Author: Sandy Barris
Category: Business
Price: $27.00
Beat BetonMarkets
Author: - Jesse Livermore
Category: Business
Price: $39.00
The Complete Lung Detoxification Guide
Category: Health
Price: $49.95
No B.S. SEO System: The Complete Guide To Search Engine Optimization
Author: Jack Sarlo
Category: SEO and Promotion
Price: $49.95


Site owner: Put the rating form on your site!
Listing wrong or need to be updated? Modify it.

Popular:

Top 20
New
Free

Category:


Action (54)
Adventure (161)
Affiliates (60)
Animals (183)
Arts (118)
Auto (61)
Aviation (17)
Beauty (115)
Body (183)
Business (675)
Cats (35)
Child Custody (32)
Children (261)
Christian Books (117)
Classic (167)
Computers (71)
Cooking (300)
Cover design (3)
Crafts (85)
Decorating (26)
Diet (268)
Dogs (156)
E-Business (710)
E-Marketing (589)
Education (329)
Entertainment (179)
Family (149)
Fantasy (72)
Fiction (170)
Finance (155)
Fish and Fishing (61)
Fitness (382)
Food (141)
For Authors (89)
Forex (33)
Gambling (13)
Games (71)
Garden (131)
Golf (81)
Green Products (43)
Health (1001)
History (33)
Hobbies (181)
Holidays (50)
Home (213)
Home Business (202)
Horror (27)
Horse (27)
How To (263)
Humor (53)
Illustrated Picture Books (23)
Internet (160)
Investing (88)
Jobs (176)
Law and Legal (25)
Management (53)
Manuals (169)
Marketing (31)
Medicine (98)
Men (100)
Military (8)
Mind (129)
Music (116)
Mystery (52)
Nature (48)
Nonfiction (95)
Novels (37)
Parenting (147)
Philosophy (33)
Photography (56)
Poetry (31)
Programming (40)
Psychology (221)
Real Estate (72)
Relationships (528)
Religion (102)
Remedies (184)
Romance (96)
SEO and Promotion (76)
Science (16)
Science Fiction (40)
Self Defense (74)
Self Help (542)
Spirituality (106)
Sports (197)
Thrillers (49)
Travel (131)
Wedding (51)
Weight Loss (265)
Women (238)
Young Adult (46)

Hide Menu

Related E-Books

This ebook included to packages:
Classic Package!
164 Classic ebooks Click here to see the full list of these ebooks
(total value $549.40)
Buy Now

just for $35.95
$513
off
Silver Package!
Any 100 ebooks from 2000+ titles Click here to see the full list of these ebooks
Buy Now

just for $29.95
Gold Package!
Get full access to 2000+ ebooks Click here to see the full list of these ebooks
Buy Now

just for $49.95
Want to learn about new ebooks?Subscribe to our Newsletter:
Sign Up


eLibrary Awards:


Date: 3/5/2008
From: World Wide Web Awards™
E-Library has been selected to receive the World Wide Web Awards™ "Gold"Award.

The World Wide Web Gold Award represents web presence at its best.
Mistake found?

Select spelling error with your mouse and press Esc

HomeAdvanced searchTop RatedPopularNewFreeAdd Your EbookModify Your Listing

Authors ListFor AuthorsCover designPrivacy & Terms & CopyrightsResell RightsAffiliatesContact

Copyright © 2002 - 2016 eLibrary